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Disputed Ruins and Phoenician Heritage in Beirut

By Nicholas Baldo | July 4, 2012 |

A development dispute surrounding the destruction of ancient ruins in Beirut stirs debate and reflection on the nation’s past.

Mining in Yukon

By Chris Kremer | |

Yukon, Canada’s westernmost territory, has few people but generates much mining revenue.

Flood and Political Conflicts in Northeastern India

By Nicholas Baldo | July 3, 2012 |

Flooding in Northeastern India and its sometimes-fraught political backdrop.

Mapping U.S. Disasters

By Nicholas Baldo | July 1, 2012 | 3 Comments

As recently highlighted on the weblog Per Square Mile, amateur geographer Crystal Dorn has mapped county-level U.S. data on official disasters from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and published it as a webGIS. Taking this map at face value, it seems that 54 years has not been enough time for clear patterns to emerge when each county is shaded …

Visualizing California’s Soggy Past

By Nicholas Baldo | June 29, 2012 |

A previous GeoNote highlighted a collaborative effort to map historical changes in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin RiverDelta. In a similar spirit, the fantasy satellite map shown at left, created by Central Valley geographer Mark Clark and noted by Frank Jacobs, imagines what the entire state might have looked like in 1851. Perhaps the map’s most salient feature is massive Tulare Lake, …

“Mapping Stereotypes” Farcical Maps

By Chris Kremer | June 28, 2012 | 7 Comments

Yanko Tsvetkov’s farcical Mapping Stereotypes series humorously represents the views that people of various countries, mostly in Europe, hold of other nations. Many of the maps from the Bulgarian graphic designer label Europe’s countries with stereotypes that people of different nations in the region hold about them. Examples of such maps include “Europe According to Italians” and “Europe According to Bulgarians.” …

Public Education and Ethnicity in Connecticut

By Chris Kremer | April 24, 2012 |
Connecticut race and ethnicities concentrations

Connecticut has stark contrasts in prosperity and social development, including educational quality. The map showing the percentage of students of color in Connecticut school districts demonstrates that a handful of urban areas have high concentrations of people of color, while many of the school districts in the state have mostly white students. Unfortunately, it was impossible to locate the source of …

“The World According to Finns” Farcical Map

By Chris Kremer | April 19, 2012 | 40 Comments
The World According to Finns

Just as the maps entitled “The World According to Americans” and “The American World” poke fun at geographical prejudices in the United States, “The World According to Finns” offers a farcical representation of geographical prejudices in Finland. Like the other two “World According to…” maps, it not only glorifies the country whose perspective it is supposed to represent, but also assigns mostly …

Mother Goddess Worship in Vietnam

By Rebecca Hecht | February 24, 2012 |
Wikipedia Religious Freedom Map

Although Vietnam is in name a Communist state, the practice of mother goddess worship endures through much of the country. For the first time, the worship of Mother Goddesses is on display at a public museum in Hanoi.

Protests on the island of Réunion

By Rebecca Hecht | |
Wikipedia Map of France and its Overseas Possessions

French news outlets are reporting “spontaneous and unorganized” outbursts of violence on the island of Réunion, one of France’s overseas departments. Protests against the high cost of living and rising prices of fuel exploded several days ago.

“The American World” Farcical Maps

By Chris Kremer | February 9, 2012 | 8 Comments

“The American World” belongs to a genre of maps that make fun of the geographical ignorance and prejudices of people from different countries. These maps are usually made by Internet users and crop up on blogs, forums, and social networking websites. They often have titles like “The World According to India,” or “The World According to Americans.” While some of …

The Role of the Caucasus in Russian Cultural and Intellectual History

By Vitaliy L. Rayz | February 3, 2012 | One Comment
The Role of the Caucasus in Russian Cultural and Intellectual History

(by guest blogger Vitaliy L. Rayz, in collaboration with Martin W. Lewis)
The present GeoCurrents series has focused on the peoples of the Caucasus, examining Russia and Russians only insofar as they have impacted the region. But the Caucasus has played a significant role in the politics of Russia, and in its cultural history as well. The most prominent Russian poets …

Last Insights into Global Economic Inequality

By Andrew Linford | June 8, 2011 | One Comment

Calculations of economic development are usually separated from considerations of population and physical geography. The map above, which introduces the concept of GDP Density. This approach shows how much economic value is generated per unit of land. The map clearly displays not only which areas are the most economically productive, but it also shows

Glimpses of Inequality in the United States

By Andrew Linford | June 1, 2011 |

Inequality in the United States is a surprisingly complex issue. Although most Americans are aware at some level that major inequalities exist in their country, a substantial gap separates believed comprehension and the actual facts. This entry will explore inequality in the United States primarily through three lenses: regional differences, the rural-urban divide, and

Inequality Trends in South Africa

By Andrew Linford | May 17, 2011 | 3 Comments

According to the Gini coefficient, as well as other inequality measurements, South Africa ranks as one of the most unequal countries in the world. Of course, measuring inequality is multidimensional, which particularly applies to South Africa. In discussions of South Africa, severe economic disparities are often highlighted. Much of the country’s inequality stems

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