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Articles tagged with: Continents

Where Is the Caucasus?

By Martin W. Lewis | January 11, 2012 | 41 Comments
Geopolitical Map of the Caucasus

For the next two weeks or so, GeoCurrents will examine the Caucasus. This unusually long focus on a particular place derives from several reasons. The Caucasus is one of the most culturally complex and linguistically diverse parts of the world, noted as well for its geopolitical intricacy and intractable conflicts. The region contains three internationally recognized sovereign states (Georgia, …

Siberia Is More Russian than European Russia

By Martin W. Lewis | January 24, 2011 | 4 Comments

Just as a state-based vision of the world exaggerates the distinctiveness of small countries, so it masks difference within large countries. When macro-countries like Russia, China, or the United States are mapped as singular units, vast disparities between their constituent areas vanish from view. The public view of massive Russia is especially

The Geography of FIFA & International Recognition

By Samuel Raphael Franco | June 21, 2010 | 4 Comments

FIFA divides the world into the six regions:These six “continents” hold a a quarry of curiosities.Palestine competes as its own country in the South Asian Football Federation, and is a FIFA member. On the other side of the West Bank, Israel is the only country in the region that competes in the European UEFA.The South

How Many Continents Are There?

By Martin W. Lewis | March 4, 2010 | One Comment

The main problem with the continental scheme of world division is its mixture of physical geographical criteria (continents are defined as landmasses more or less separated from each other by waterways) with human geographical criteria (Europe is separated from Asia not by the physical landscape but by historical and cultural features). Intellectual coherence calls

Nonsense about Continents

By Martin W. Lewis | March 3, 2010 | 5 Comments

Basic geographical education in the United States remains, in a word, pathetic. As students are required to learn virtually nothing about the world, we should not be surprised that few young Americans have any idea where Iraq or Afghanistan are located. And the one locational lesson in global geography that young students are required

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