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Articles in Border Disputes

When Is an Island Not An Island? Caribbean Maritime Disputes

By Martin W. Lewis | March 21, 2011 | One Comment
caribbean maritime disputes map

Matters of basic geographical definition can be extremely important in international disputes and negotiations, especially when it comes to maritime claims. According to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, any country can claim a 200-nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) around every island that it controls, usually splitting the differences with

Territorial Disputes and Cultural Accommodations in Vanuatu

By Martin W. Lewis | June 30, 2010 | 2 Comments

Melanesia, as we have seen, is culturally varied. Global linguistic diversity probably reaches its extreme in the highlands of New Guinea, but Vanuatu contends for the title. Its 243,000 people speak 113 indigenous languages. According to the Wikipedia, its “density of languages, per capita, is the highest of any nation in the world, with an

China’s Troubled Korean Border Zone

By Martin W. Lewis | June 9, 2010 | 2 Comments

The Korean language extends well beyond North Korea’s boundary into Manchuria in northeastern China. Roughly two million Koreans live in China, mostly in the border zone. Almost half of them reside in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture, where Korean cultural institutions receive official support. Although the area was part of several historical Korean kingdoms

Western Sahara, The United States Senate, and McDonald’s

By Martin W. Lewis | April 7, 2010 | 4 Comments

On March 16, 2010, fifty-four U.S. senators sent a letter to Secretary of State Clinton urging the Obama administration to seek a resolution to the conflict in Western Sahara. They argued that the United States should accept Morocco’s annexation of the territory, provided that Morocco allows Western Sahara the autonomy that it promised in

Belize Vs. Guatemala

By Martin W. Lewis | January 8, 2010 |

A major controversy engulfed the small Central American country of Belize in early January 2010 after its foreign minister, Wilifred Erlington, described the border between his country and Guatemala as “artificial.” Enraged Belizean nationalists denounced Erlington as a “sell-out,” while opposition leaders demanded his resignation.

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